TURKEY VEGETABLE WILD RICE SOUP

With thanksgiving just two days away, holiday hostesses everywhere are busy with details including last minute trips to the grocery store, preparing that favorite cranberry  orange  salad that grandma used to make every year and last minute house cleaning. The day after Thanksgiving it seems that we always have lots of leftover turkey on hand. My husband grows tired of turkey sandwiches in no time at all and says where’s the beef? Turkey vegetable wild rice soup is the perfect solution to the leftover turkey dilemma in my house. Your family will love it on these cool November days. This soup is also a nutritional superstar since it is chock full of antioxidant rich vegetables, healthy spices, broth, leftover turkey and wild rice. Wild rice is harvested in northern Minnesota and is an excellent source of fiber and  magnesium. It is also a very good source of zinc, folate, phosphorus and iron as well. Wild rice is also a gluten free grain so can be enjoyed by people who must  avoid or limit gluten in their diets. Since I am a Minnesota girl at heart, I really enjoy wild rice, especially as a side dish over the holiday season or in soups that I prepare this time of year.

Turkey Vegetable Wild Rice Soup is  very nutritious, filling and perfect for waist watchers. Soup fills you up not out! A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition surveyed 20000 adults and found that on average, the soup eaters weighed less and had smaller waists than those who didn’t consume soup several times in a week. Soup is very satiating so it is a healthy first course for your meals. You will likely eat much less at your meal after you have consumed a bowl of soup. Creamy or cheesy soups are much higher in fat and calorie content however so choosing broth based soups would be more beneficial. Canned soups are also very high in sodium content so make your own with low sodium broths or choose low sodium or sodium reduced versions if you prefer to use canned soups. Be a food detective also by checking your food labels. Avoid broths or soups containing monosodium glutamate which is an excitotoxin.

Serve this soup with a hard roll, fresh fruit and sparkling cranberry juice for a quick and easy meal.

The recipe calls for broth which is the broth from which you roast your turkey in. I add a cup of water in the roaster pan when I roast my turkey so that I will have plenty of broth to make gravy with and save in the refrigerator for soup the next day. If you would like to you can make bone broth from the turkey carcass after you have removed the meat from the bones. Google a recipe for turkey or chicken bone broth for preparation instructions. Bone broth is an excellent source of collagen, which is the protein found in vertebrae animals-in their bones, skin, cartilage, ligaments, tendons and bone marrow. As we age, our own cartilage in our bodies diminishes. Collagen from the turkey or chicken bone broth when consumed as a part of your diet on a regular basis may actually help restore our own cartilage according to Dr. Josh Axe, DC, DMN, CNS. Bone broths also contain minerals such as sulphur. calcium, magnesium and phosphorus that your body easily absorbs. The collagen and minerals in bone broth may be very beneficial for our joint health. Bone broth  may also improve our gut health and is immune supportive according to a research study from the University of Nebraska which discovered that the amino acids produced when preparing chicken stock  helped reduce inflammation in the respiratory system and improved digestion. Of course, we have all heard that consuming chicken soup is good for us when we have a cold or the flu and science supports this. This soup freezes well so you can keep it on hand in your freezer and easily prepare during cold and flu season.

Turkey Vegetable Wild Rice Soup

 

5.0 from 2 reviews
TURKEY VEGETABLE WILD RICE SOUP
Author: 
Recipe type: Soup
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cups diced cooked turkey
  • 2 cups cooked wild rice
  • 1 cup cooked fresh or frozen sliced carrots
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen broccoli or okra
  • 1 cup fresh sliced mushrooms
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 TB coconut or olive oil
  • 32 oz turkey or chicken broth or you may use chicken or turkey bone broth
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp onion powder
  • ¼ chopped green onions or fresh chives
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp turmeric
Instructions
  1. Melt the coconut or olive oil in a medium sized frying pan. Add chopped celery, green onions or chives and mushrooms. Saute until the vegetables are tender. Place these ingredients in a large pot or dutch oven on your stove. Add the remaining ingredients and stir well with a large spoon. cook on your stove until the soup boils and then simmer for at least one hour until all of the vegetables are tender. Serve immediately. You may also prepare this soup in a large crock pot. Place all of the ingredients in your crock pot and cook on the medium setting for three hours.
Notes
Information in this food blog is not intended to be taken as medical advice. Always consult with your personal health care practitioner for medical and/or nutritional advice.

Recipes and blog content are subject to copy right laws.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1/ 12 of recipe Calories: 101 Fat: 2 grams Saturated fat: 1 gram Unsaturated fat: 1 gram Trans fat: 0 grams Carbohydrates: 10 grams Sodium: 409 mg Fiber: 2 grams Protein: 11 grams Cholesterol: 13 mg

 

Turkey Vegetable Wild Rice soup

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving. Take time to count your blessings!

GARDEN FRESH CHILI

It’s late October already. Most of our beautiful fall leaves have fallen to the ground but there are still a few golden and red trees shimmering in the sunlight today in our neighborhood. With a chill in the air, I decided it was a great day to cook up some chili using some of my frozen cherry tomatoes and chives from the garden that we tended over the summer. This chili can be easily prepared in your crock pot before you dash off to work in the morning or outside to rake your last leaves of the season.

Garden Fresh Chili

My husband and I are moving towards consuming more grass fed meat in our diet so the recipe calls for grass fed ground beef. I purchased the family three pack of grass fed ground beef at Aldi’s recently and it came out to four dollars a pound. Of course, you can use regular ground beef or ground turkey if you would like to. Grass fed beef mainly comes from cattle that are fed only grass and other foraged foods throughout their lives. On October 15, 2007, the USDA established a standard definition for the “grass fed” claim that requires continuous access to pasture and prevents animals from being fed grains or grain based products. Conventional beef cattle usually consume a diet that includes grains such as corn. Grass fed beef has the following benefits: lower in total fat, more heart healthy omega 3 fatty acids and higher levels of CLA (conjugated linoleic acid) a type of fat that can help reduce heart disease and cancer and grass fed beef  is higher in precursors for Vitamin C and E. Raising grass fed cattle is also environmentally friendly since it can hep decrease greenhouse gas emissions. I like the taste of grass fed beef better also.

 

Garden Fresh Chili served with Sparkling Cranberry Spritzer

GARDEN FRESH CHILI
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Meal, Soup
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 12 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound (16 oz) grass fed ground beef
  • 2 cups raw, halved cherry tomatoes
  • 1 cup Fruit Raspberry Salsa (may use another brand or flavor of salsa if desired)
  • 1 14.5 oz can of Dell Monte Stewed tomatoes with basil, garlic and oregano
  • 1 15.5 oz can of drained and rinsed kidney beans
  • 1 15.5 oz can drained and rinsed black beans
  • ½ cup finely chopped fresh chives or onion
  • 1 clove garlic minced
  • 2 cups water
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp each garlic and onion powder
  • 1 tsp chili powder
Instructions
  1. Brown ground beef in a frying pan and drain off fat. Place ground beef in a large cooking pot or crock pot and add the other ingredients. Draining and rinsing the canned beans will reduce the sodium content. You could also purchase low sodium beans or pre-cook your own dried beans if sodium content is a concern.If preparing the chili on your stove top, bring to a boil and lower the heat, simmering for at least 30 minutes . If preparing in the crock pot, cook on the low setting for 3-4 hours. You can also cook on high heat and it will be done in approximately 2 hours.
Notes
Information presented in this food blog is not intended to provide medical advice. Please contact your personal health care provider for nutritional or medical advice.

1/12 recipe = 1 carbohydrate choice
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1/12 recipe Calories: 172 Fat: 6 grams Saturated fat: 1 gram Trans fat: 0 grams Carbohydrates: 19 grams Sodium: 187 mg Fiber: 4 grams Protein: 11 grams Cholesterol: 23 mg

 

When shopping for my chili ingredients, I came across  Del Monte stewed  tomatoes with basil, oregano and garlic. They have sea salt added and are non-GMO so I used these in my recipe.

Chili is not only tasty on a cool day but super nutritious also. It is a great source of vitamin C  and potassium(from the tomatoes), Vitamins K and A (from the chives) fiber, iron, (from the beans and beef) Vitamin B12, B6, selenium, zinc, phosphorus (from the beef) as well as magnesium (from the beef and beans). Serve it along side a fresh fruit salad, whole grain (or gluten free) crackers and some sparkling water or cranberry juice and you have an easy and nutritious meal for your family.

We traveled through several small cities along the Mississippi River on a recent fall trip. We did spend the evening at the New Albin Inn in New Albin, Iowa and explored this quaint small town the next morning. We purchased several local items at the new Albin Meat Market. It reminded me of an old general store. I purchased this Spirit Valley Raspberry  Fruit Salsa which I used in this chili recipe. They had a small wine section also and we bought a bottle of Cranberry Crush wine since it won the first prize at the Iowa state Fair in the wine division. The wine is made by the Winneshiek winery in Decorah, Iowa. It was a very sweet tasting wine that we both enjoyed. I mixed it with some cherry flavored mineral water to make a spritzer and it was very good. My husband snapped a picture of the old narrow lighted bridge below which is built over the Mississippi river in Lancing, Iowa.

Easy to Prepare Garden Fresh Chili

I have included some pictures from our annual fall leaf tour. We traveled over to the river road along the Mississippi River and the colors were gorgeous!

Mississippi River View in La Crosse, Wisconsin
Marina in La Crosse, Wisconsin

 

Awesome Autumn View

 

 

Gorgeous View of Mississippi River and Wisconsin from Iowa State Park

 

Mississippi River View, Pikes Peak State Park, Mc Gregor, Iowa

 

ACORN SQUASH WITH WILD RICE STUFFING

I can certainly feel a chill in the air here in Minnesota. Most of my fall gardening projects are done now and my rosebushes are covered to protect them in anticipation for those long winter months ahead. This is the time of year that I love to spend time in my warm cozy kitchen preparing  recipes using the squash that I  harvested from my garden that we planted last summer. Squash tend to keep very well long after they have been harvested so we can enjoy them in the cold months ahead of us.

Serve with fresh fruit and a kale salad for a delicious and nutritious meal.

Wild rice is also grown and harvested in northern Minnesota.  I recently decided to prepare a delicious main meal that incorporates both the wild rice and acorn squash. I served the Acorn Squash with Wild Rice for lunch recently on one of those cool days and we really enjoyed the taste and texture of this meal. My husband and I are also very nutrition conscious  and we enjoyed the meal for it’s awesome health benefits as well.

Serve with a glass of sparkling cranberry, grape or pomegranate juice or red wine.

Acorn squash is an excellent source of immune supportive Vitamins A  and C. It is also a good dietary source of potassium, manganese, copper, niacin, folate, thiamine and Vitamin B6. Just a 1/2 cup of cooked acorn squash provides 20% of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) or daily value(DV) of Vitamin C for healthy adults as well as 4 grams of fiber.  The B vitamins which include niacin, thiamine, riboflavin, folic acid, Vitamin B6 and Vitamin B12 help to maintain a healthy metabolism, nerve function, adrenal function, liver function and are also valuable to skin and eye health. The B vitamins help the body convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose) which is used to produce energy in our bodies. The B vitamins also help the body metabolize fats and protein.

ACORN SQUASH WITH WILD RICE STUFFING
Author: 
Recipe type: Main Dish or Side Dish
Cuisine: Regular, Vegetarian or Vegan
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 6 servings
 
Ingredients
  • 3 medium acorn squash, (approximately 1½ pounds each) halved lengthwise with the seeds removed
  • 3 TB olive oil or melted coconut oil
  • 2 TB pure maple syrup
  • ¼ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 cup celery stalks, finely chopped
  • ¾ cup finely chopped mushrooms
  • 1 tsp thyme seasoning
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups cooked wild rice (prepare on your stove or in a rice cooker)
  • ¾ cup finely chopped walnuts
  • ⅓ cup chopped dried cranberries,
Instructions
  1. Heat your oven to 350 degrees F. Place the squash cut side up on a baking sheet. Brush the squash with 1 TB melted coconut oil or olive oil on the inside of the squash halves .Add 1 tsp of pure maple syrup to each squash half. Sprinkle ground cinnamon on each squash half. Roast squash in the oven or approximately 50-60minutes or until the squash is tender. If desired, you may microwave the squash until tender, ( approximately 18-20 minutes per 2 squash halves).
  2. Place 2 TB of melted coconut or olive oil in a large frying pan and saute the chopped onions, garlic, mushrooms and celery until they are softened which may take about 5 minutes. Add the thyme and black pepper to this mixture and stir well. Add the cooked wild rice, dried cranberries and chopped walnuts to the vegetable mixture in the frying pan and gently fold in. Continue heating until the mixture is warmed through, approximately 3-5 minutes .Remove the frying pan from heat source.
  3. After you have removed your cooked squash from the oven, add the wild rice filling mixture to each squash half. Serve immediately
Nutrition Information
Serving size: ⅙ th recipe Calories: 375 Fat: 14 grams Trans fat: 0 grams Carbohydrates: 62 grams Sodium: 27 mg Fiber: 6 grams Protein: 7 grams Cholesterol: 0 mg

 

Acorn squash and wild rice are also  very good sources of dietary fiber. One half cup of cooked accorn squash provides 4.5 grams of fiber. One cup of cooked wild rice provides 3 grams of fiber. According to Web MD, the average American consumes 15 grams of fiber per day. The Institute of Medicine recommends that healthy women consume 25 grams of fiber per day and healthy men consume 38 grams per day. Some people may need to limit dietary fiber for certain medical conditions so please consult your family physician or your personal registered dietitian for guidelines concerning this.

Wild rice is a good source of protein, folate, manganese, zinc, phosphorous, niacin, Vitamin B6 and magnesium. Most Americans tend to fall short of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) or daily value (DV) for magnesium. One cup of cooked wild rice supplies 13% of the daily value or ( RDA) for magnesium , 7% of the daily value or (RDA) for iron and 6.5 grams of protein. I love the taste and texture of wild rice, not to mention all of the nutritional benefits of this grain.

This recipe would be a delicious addition to your Thanksgiving menu.

Vintage Canned Foods found by my mother in her attic

My food blog Vintage Nutrition Kitchen is inspired by many of the vintage china and serving bowls, platters, glassware and goblets that were passed on to me by my mother, grandmother and great aunt. I found that I was letting these unique and beautiful items sit in my china cabinet admired, but unused. When I began writing this food blog, I wanted to use these precious family treasures as serving dishes for my food blog creations. I also love to collect and display vintage kitchen gadgets in my cozy country themed kitchen. My mother was exploring the attic of our century old home when I was a child and she found the vintage food cans pictured above. She cleaned them off and she shellaced the cans to preserve the finish on them. I have them proudly displayed in a china cabinet in my living room. She certainly had a knack for finding old things. She was digging in our garden of the home that I grew up in and ended up finding a century old nickel that time. As I grow older, I am finding that I appreciate those memories more and more.

Minneopa State Park, Mankato, MN

 

Fall is certainly one of my favorite seasons here in the midwest. Although it gets very cold here during the winter months, we are blessed to be able to enjoy four different and colorful seasons. My husband, mother in law and myself took a fall leaf tour near Mankato, Minnesota a few weeks ago and I am including some of the beautiful pictures that I snapped that day.

Seven Mile Park, near Mankato Mn

 

I admit that I took a little break from my food blog  and plan to publish my food blog Vintage Nutrition Kitchen monthly in the future. So far this has been a very enjoyable and relaxing hobby for me. I may end up changing and shortening my food blog domain slightly  so that it is compatible  with Twitter.  I will keep my readers posted of any changes. Have a  wonderful Thanksgiving!

 

Farm-Fresh feed.png